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Hepatitis Testing

Hepatitis Testing

Hepatitis Panel (A, B, & C)

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver tissue. While some people have no symptoms, others can develop a yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes, vomiting, tiredness, loss of appetite, diarrhea or abdominal pain. Hepatitis can be acute (temporary) or chronic (long term). this depends on whether it last for more than six months. The most common cause of hepatitis is viruses. Other causes include: heavy alcohol use, toxins, autoimmune diseases, certain medications, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).


There are 5 main types of viral hepatitis: A, B, C, D, and E.


Hepatitis A is contracted by consuming contaminated food or water. Type B can by contracted by the sharing of contaminated needles, unprotect sex, or exposure to the blood of an infected person. Type C can be spread through blood by contaminated needles during drug use, via tattooing, or through unprotected sex. Hepatitis D only infects people who are already infected with type B. Type E can be contracted by consuming contaminated food or water. 


The only types that are preventable through immunization are types A, B, and D. There is no specific treatment for NASH, but a healthy lifestyle that includes physical activity and healthy eating is important. 


Hepatitis presents a broad range of symptoms, from a complete lack of symptoms to sever liver failure. The acute form of hepatitis is generally caused by a viral infection. It is characterized by constitutional symptoms that are self-limiting. The initial phase has non-specific, flu-like symptoms that are common to many acute viral infections. they may include: fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite, vomiting, headaches, and joint pain.


Chronic hepatitis is often asymptomatic in the early stages. It can only be detected my liver laboratory studies. As it progresses it can cause: fatigue, vomiting, nausea, loss of appetite, and joint pain. It also interferes with the hormonal functions of the liver.


As most cases are asymptomatic, it is important to get tested.



Test Result Ranges:

Hepatitis A:

If your test results show positive, this indicates that you have contracted the Hepatitis A disease. If you have a negative result, but have been exposed to Hepatitis A, you may want to retest in 6 to 9 weeks.

If your lab results indicate a positive, please see your primary care physician.

Hepatitis B:

A positive results indicates that you have contracted an active Hepatitis B infection. A negative results indicates that you have never been exposed to Hepatitis B or that you have recovered from an acute Hepatitis B infection.

If your lab results indicate a positive, please see your primary care physician.

Hepatitis C:

If you return a positive results, you have more than likely been infected with Hepatitis C. You may not display any symptoms. Your physician may also have you retested to confirm. A negative results means that you have not been infected with Hepatitis C.

If your results are positive, please see your primary care physician.