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Alcohol testing

Alcohol testing

For your health, and their peace of mind.

Alcohol testing can provide immediate answers if you suspect an employee is under the influence of alcohol while at work. It can also be used as part of the application process prior to being hired. There are different ways the test can be administered. There is a breathalyzer-this measure how much alcohol is currently in the blood by blowing into it for a set amount of time. A blood test can also be used to determine whether or not a person is under the influence of alcohol. A blood test will measure the amount of alcohol that is in the blood at the time it is drawn. A urine test can also be used to determine this as well.


These are the different methods, explained more in depth.


Breath Alcohol Testing


Evidential Breath testing, or EBT, is the most commonly used type of testing used for alcohol. The device is used by a trained Breath Alcohol Technician, or BAT. This test is used by having the donor blow into the EBT mouthpeice for 6 seconds, continuously, or until an adequate amount of breath has been collected. It is a federally recognized method of testing, and is in most states as an accurate and non-invasive form of testing.


Saliva Alcohol Screen


This is salive-based screening device that allows the employer to obtain an almost instant reading, within 5 minutes after administering the test. The employee must be monitored for at least 15 minutes prior to the test being administered to ensure that there is no outside contaminates (ie mouthwash). Easy to use, a non-negative result would have to be comfirmed by an EBT device within 30 minutes of the initla screen. It is only valid as screen on non-negatives.


Urine Alcohol Testing


Although an option, Urine Alcohol testing is not a federally recognized way of testing, nor is it valid in most states. Urine alcohol tests can easily produce false positives with certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, and it can fail to provide adequate quantitative levels for reporting.